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A Spatial Hedonic Analysis of the Effects of Wind Energy Facilities on Surrounding Property Values in the United States

A Spatial Hedonic Analysis of the Effects of Wind Energy Facilities on Surrounding Property Values in the United States

Date: 8/31/2013

Researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory published a new report, A Spatial Hedonic Analysis of the Effects of Wind Energy Facilities on Surrounding Property Values in the United States, that builds on a 2009 study that also investigated impacts on home values near wind facilities. As part of the new study, the researchers analyzed more than 50,000 home sales near 67 wind facilities in 27 counties across nine U.S. states. In summary, the research did not find any statistically identifiable impacts of wind facilities to nearby home property values.

Ben Hoen is a principal research associate in the Electricity Markets and Policy Group at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and lead author of the new report. "Without this kind of research, which investigates actual impacts (as opposed to perceived impacts), stakeholders will find it extremely difficult to weigh costs and benefits of a proposed or operating wind facility," Hoen said. "The community concern of potential impact to property values is one of those risks that stakeholders are commonly asked to weigh, and therefore our work should help them understand how much weight to give those concerns."

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded both reports.

This information was last updated on 9/9/2013

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