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Video: Oklahoma town cashing in on the winds of progress

Video: Oklahoma town cashing in on the winds of progress

Date: 3/1/2009

Location: Weatherford, OK

Source: Oklahoma Horizon is a TV show that cover stories showcasing people and businesses that contribute to Oklahoma's economic success and quality of life.

This is the text version for the video. Time: 00:02:55

The video opens with Rob McClendon, Host of Oklahoma Horizon, broadcasting from an open field in Oklahoma with multiple wind turbines turning in the background. You can hear the wind blowing in the microphone.

Rob McClendon, Host, Oklahoma Horizon: "Well northwest Oklahoma alone has more than 20,000 megawatts of wind generating capacity, which could power over five-million homes. A potential that could make Oklahoma the number one wind energy producer in the nation, and has many western Oklahoma towns believing their future lies with what's sweeping down the plain. As our Keith Smith showed us earlier this year, Weatherford is hoping to cash in on the winds of progress."

A sped-up video clip of cars driving on Interstate 40 with wind turbines on the side. The scene then changes to a large wind turbine with its blades turning, then to multiple turbines, then to a wide shot of the city of Weatherford with the wind turbines in the background. Leslie Crall, a local, opens a gate toward a large wind turbine in front of him.

(Voiceover)
Hard to miss, even if you're in a rush. Nearly a hundred wind turbines surround the small town of Weatherford off I-40 in western Oklahoma. Longtime local, Leslie Crall, showing off what he likes to call his wind crop.

Leslie Crall driving his truck up to a wind turbine.

Leslie Crall: "This is one of two wind towers that are on my family's farm."

(Voiceover)
A farmer at the forefront of the state's growing wind industry.

Leslie Crall speaking to the camera.

Leslie Crall: "As you can tell by looking at the grass and my hair it's blowing pretty good today."

Weatherford Mayor Mike Brown speaks to the camera.

Mike Brown: "Most days the wind's gonna blow."

Mike Brown is in an office pointing to a location on a satellite map that is on the wall. Video changes to large wind turbines with a farm house in the foreground.

(Voiceover)
Mayor Mike Brown says the wind energy center has been a breath of fresh air. Since its inception in 2005, going green has meant more green, a financial windfall.

Mike Brown talking to the camera in front of the wind display at City Hall.

Mike Brown: "Each one of them receives somewhere between four and five thousand dollars a year per turbine, for a twenty year contract and naturally they spend that money here in Weatherford."

A video shot of wind resource maps of the state of Oklahoma, an electrical transmission line, substation, and a home with a large wind turbine in the background.

(Voiceover)
Jobs have been created with the investment in wind energy that produces enough electricty to power more than forty-four thousand homes.

Mike Brown talking to the camera in front of the wind display at City Hall.

Mike Brown: "When they actually constructed the wind turbines there was about 150 people that came in to, you know, actually build those turbines."

A video shot of the American Flag. The sound of road noise and wind. A billboard that says, "The Weaterford Wind Energy Center: Clean, Renewable Energy to Power Oklahoma."

Bill Shonley, Weaterford's Economic Development Director: "We didn't pick them, they picked us."

Bill Shonley working at his desk. A model wind turbine spins.

(Voiceover)
Weatherford's economic development director Bill Shonley says wind is the way to go.

Bill Shonley talks to the camera.

Bill Shonley: "They're good paying jobs. And they're steady jobs. And they're needed jobs."

Mike Brown talking to the camera in front of the wind display at City Hall. A shot of four large wind turbines behind cows laying in a field. Various shots of the wind farm and a shadow of a large wind turbine's blades moving on a farm field.

Mike Brown: "There's been close to two million dollars that has come back to our community to be spent for the people who live here. They tell us that if the wind's blowing at least seven or eight miles an hour that they're making electricity, so even though we're apologetic about the wind sometimes, the people in that business say that's the sound of money."

Leslie Crall talks to the camera. Farm field is in the background. A shot of a large wind turbine with its blades turning. Transitions to Leslie Crall leaning against his truck looking up at the wind turbine.

Leslie Crall: "If you get underneath them, they're very awe inspiring. They look large from the road, but when you get up underneath one of them, they're HUGE."

A photo of the Weatherford Wind Energy Center display next to City Hall. Three information pannels reside underneath a curved awning, flanked with two models of a large wind turbine. To the side of the display is a large wind turbine blade laying on the ground. Photo credit: Corey Herndon, Oklahoma Department of Commerce.

The Weatherford Wind Energy Center display next to City Hall, Weatherford, Oklahoma. View a larger photo. Photo credit: Corey Herndon, Oklahoma Department of Commerce.

Mike Brown at the Weatherford Wind Energy Center picking up a brochure, "Wind Power Trail" from a brochure display.

(Voiceover)
And you don't have to go far to find out about the two hundred sixty foot wind turbines. There's a display right next to city hall.

A shot of the Weatherford Wind Energy Center and Mike Brown talking to the camera in front of a large wind turbine blade displayed on the ground.

Mike Brown: "I think that when people get up here and take a look at the base of that blade and realize how big it is, you know a lot of them are in awe."

Wind turbines and a farm.

(Voiceover)
A sense of pride for a place that has always been blessed with Oklahoma's most abundant resource.

This story was re-posted with permission.

This information was last updated on March 01, 2009